Genetic convergence?

23 Jul

It is unfortunate that Jokodo had to leave us at the point of the crucial question of genetic convergence theories in the consideration of how modern humans came about. Are there any further inputs on this from the wider scientific community, especially from ‘Someone’ whose second contribution to the debate I had put on hold, but is now reproduced here?:

Submitted   on 2012/07/17 at 6:22   amI   expect there are thousands of mixed-race couples, if mixed-race couples had a   dramatically increased chance of infertility, that would be testable. But   because they weren’t forcibly mated in a lab, you can’t conclude anything   from that? According to that criteria, we couldn’t find out if cigarettes   cause cancer, because we didn’t force anyone to smoke.According   to this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interracial_marriage

A study   of mitochondrial DNA found, “1.34% of West Eurasian female admixture in Hong   Kong Cantonese population” Hong Kong has a population of 7 million, so that   would require tens of thousands of cross-bred people to reach that level.

In the   U.S. according to this:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/national/daily/dec98/melt29.htm
“36 percent of young Asian Pacific American men born in the United States   marry white women, and 45 percent of U.S.-born Asian Pacific American women   took white husbands”

So   you’re proposing that with these thousands and thousands of examples, nobody   has noticed if they have a higher rate of fertility problems.

And   then you propose we need to “examine records of their relative susceptibilities   to diseases like malaria …” How are you going to do that? Are you going to   put them in a lab and expose them to malaria over and over? Doesn’t that   raise even worse ethical questions? Oh wait, apparently now you think it’s   okay to “examine records.”

But we   already know a disproportionate number of black Africans have a genetic   resistance to malaria, thanks to a sickle-cell gene. You’re the only one who   thinks that’s enough to call them another species.

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One Response to “Genetic convergence?”

  1. Jokodo July 23, 2012 at 4:51 pm #

    “But we already know a disproportionate number of black Africans have a genetic resistance to malaria, thanks to a sickle-cell gene. You’re the only one who thinks that’s enough to call them another species.”

    Actually, it’s much more messy than that – in *some* areas of Africa, a disproportionate number of people have genetic resistence to malaria. In other areas, the prevalence of the sickle-cell gene is no higher than in Northern Europe, and lower than in Italy, Greece, Kuwait, or northern India – areas that also sport disproportionate numbers of people with a genetic resistence to Malaria without their population being “black” by any stretch.

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